Amador Farms

Notes from Bellevue Farmers Market Exile

Summer is the time for travel. And whenever I'm out of town during Market season, I like to check in at other farmers markets if I run across one. Sadly, lately, I haven't been able to travel anywhere more exotic than Federal Way, Washington, where I did find free berries and giant slugs, as I mentioned last week.

This past Saturday found me in Federal Way again for another swim meet, with time to kill between prelims and finals. It was hot, and my son just wanted to park in the shade and nap, but I happened to spot the Federal Way Farmers Market in progress, so he had to settle for a shady parking spot near Sears while I explored. I'd missed the Thursday Bellevue Farmers Market (day one of the meet), so I knew at the very least I wanted fruit.

And there was fruit to be had, along with familiar produce. I even saw one of the BFM berry vendors and Amador Farms. Mission accomplished.

But the point of travel is to see new things, right? Therefore I asked about these curious items:

It turns out those are bitter melons. And what you do with them depends on your culinary tradition. The Asian guy I asked says he removes the seeds and adds them to soup. The Latino farmer said he takes the young ones, leaves the seeds in, and fries it up with an egg! You just know something that looks like that (and that tastes bitter) has got to be good for you.

Then there were these:

I've already forgotten what the farmer called them, but they look like paler versions of the zucchini your neighbor might be trying to force on you this time of year. If I found some of these on my porch, I think I'd try them grated in a baked good or roasted or stir-fried.

Demographically, Federal Way reminds me of Milpitas, California, where I grew up: lots of diversity and strip malls and good food, if you go looking for it. Did you know that almost 80% of the city population is under age 54? And 50% of the population is under 34! Maybe this explains why there were birdhouses for sale at their market that looked like camper trailers. Millenials are the hot new market for RV and camper manufacturers, ya know. I even considered shelling out $30 for the birdhouse/camper, since my 14YO loves birdwatching and also dreams of owning an RV(!).

Every farmers market has its own rules, of course, and Bellevue Farmers Market sticks to food. No crafts, no tie-dye, no stalls that smell of incense. So if you're itching for camper birdhouses or plywood furniture, you'll have to take the 35-minute trip down to Federal Way.

You won't find any wine or kombucha there, but you will see mini donuts, a Filipino food stand with lumpia, and shave ice. Long live farmers markets!

Come Buy Our Fruits, Come Buy

Ah, the wait is over. The shortage is past. Last week there were strawberries galore, multiple varieties at multiple vendors.

Skagit Sun Farm in LaConner, for example, featured both "Honey" and "Alpine" varieties. Once we got them home, we couldn't remember which was which, but both got eaten in a remarkably short amount of time.

Can you tell which is which?

Can you tell which is which?

And there were even cherries! I spotted them at both Amador Farms and Collins Family Orchards . Since my own photos don't seem to want to download from my phone today, I found these ones on Amador's Facebook page:

 

Rainiers on the branch...

Rainiers on the branch...

And Bings!

And Bings!

I think I only got a handful of cherries, out of the couple pounds I bought, since my youngest is a voracious fruit-eater, both openly and on the sly. Amador Farms does not spray its fruit, something I appreciate, having grown up in California, where I always thought I was allergic to cherries. It turns out I was probably just reacting to the pesticide because I can eat Market cherries with no problems.

On Thursdays we're frequently dashing in before heading to a swim meet, so I'm thrilled with all the prepared-food offerings, to go with our fruit. Last week the kids voted on ye olde standby, Veraci Pizza. Two of them chose pepperoni, but one of the joys of adulthood (and a more adventurous palate) is specials like the Green Dahlia:

 

Pesto, onions, tomatoes, fresh mozzarella---mmmm...

Pesto, onions, tomatoes, fresh mozzarella---mmmm...

Who knows what this week will hold? Plenty more to try, so come out rain or shine!

Washington: Home of Food, Farmers, and Logical Speed Limits

Give me land, lotsa land

Give me land, lotsa land

Hope everyone enjoyed their Memorial Day Weekend. I think many of you kicked it off as I did, by sitting in traffic and cursing your fellow citizens, but eventually the tail lights and bumpers gave way to scenes like the above, snapped off Highway 97 in Central Oregon. Actually, this was snapped on Memorial Day Saturday because we finally gave up on reaching our destination Friday and spent the night at a motel in Madras. (Lesson learned: even if you're pulling up at 10 at night, it pays to make your reservation ahead on your phone because they charge you way more when you walk in the door cold.)

Oregon is a lovely state, and their farmers, too, grow some tasty food, but they don't know a thing about speed limits. In any one-mile stretch of Highway 97, the speed limit varied from 45 to 55 to 65 to 50 to 45 again. Murder on the cruise control. There was also something weird going on with the signage because, when we entered 97 from the Washington/Maryhill side, colorful placards announced the highway multiple times as being a "Journey Through Time." Whoopee! we thought. Bring on the dinosaur dioramas and cavemen stalking the rest areas. After all the sitting in traffic, a detour through the highway equivalent of Disney World would be welcome. No such luck. Apart from a few things being named after WWII training camps and such, we're not quite sure what time (other than the present) they thought we were journeying through. Blah.

But enough about Central Oregon travel woes. The other thing about Memorial Day Weekend, or any holiday weekend, is that it throws off our grasp on days of the week. Meaning, the Bellevue Farmers Market is coming right around again!

 

'Tis the season for plant starts

'Tis the season for plant starts

If you're putting in your tomatoes or other produce, Skylight Farms of Snohomish has plant starts for you, besides pastured eggs and fresh asparagus and greens.

And, speaking of fresh-picked, nutty asparagus, I also spotted it at Alvarez Organic Farms:

 

Along with fresh garlic and all kinds of dried chiles. And there was the asparagus at Amador Farms, as well:

 

One fun thing about passing all those farms in Central Oregon was deciding where we'd most like to be a cow. Who had the most access to endless green pasture or shade or even a water feature?

Well, in Washington State, Windy N Ranch invites all comers to their place out in Ellensburg, where their cows, pigs, sheep, goats, and chickens enjoy roam certified organic fields.

 

Come for a tour--seriously.

Come for a tour--seriously.

As the Newhalls put it on their website, "Organize your group or family and come on out to see how clean, nutritional food can be produced in an environmentally sustainable ranching operation with the welfare of the animals as a top priority."

Having driven through Ellensburg regularly on my way to the Tri-Cities and, again, to speed-limit-challenged Oregon, I can attest to "Windy" being an apt word to include in any Ellensburg name. On the other hand, as you drive there, you'll appreciate how Washingtonians know a thing or two about managing speed limits. 70 all the way, baby!

See everyone tomorrow!

The Market is Off and Running!

Ah, glorious almost-summer! And what a joy to know that, for the next five months, we have tasty, fresh, local food on our doorstep every Thursday afternoon.

 

I was excited to see old favorites returning, like Alvarez Organic Farms and Collins and Martin Family Orchards...

 

Sam at Alvarez!

Sam at Alvarez!

And I loved to see new farmers and vendors joining us. There are plenty to be mentioned over the coming weeks, but for starters I hit up Amador Farms from Yakima, lured by their just-picked-that-day asparagus.

 

I also picked up delicious little Honeycrisp apples there, two kinds of potatoes, a red onion, and some tasty pears. All, as advertised, grown with "NO PESTICIDES."

Some of Carl's handiwork [pic from his website]

Some of Carl's handiwork [pic from his website]

Then we needed something to serve with our asparagus, so I hit up Carl's Cutting Board, a new vendor of charcuterie, like sausages and bacon. Carl himself recommended a delicious, "kid-friendly" sausage spiked with a few nuts(!) that was a big hit. Some of us ate it on a bun and others just sliced with sweet-hot mustard.

Check out our resulting meal:

Apart from the pilaf recipe that I got off the internet (too salty), this was a meal worth repeating. Can't wait to see what we put together this week! Even more farmers and vendors will be appearing, so hitting them all over the course of the season will be a great challenge to have.